Culture Cast – How We Can All Win in a Gig Economy

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In Season 3, Episode 5, Lorne and Lynette discuss how to make the most valuable contribution in the gig economy. With an increasing amount of consultants taking on specific assignments, they talk about a variety of ways organizations can make their gig workers feel like they’re fully appreciated, while gig workers can simultaneously feel like they’re bringing their passion and expertise to make a real contribution. 

In a way, we’re all gig workers on a limited tour of duty at our organizations. Listen to learn more. 

Please feel free to subscribe to this YouTube channel, follow this podcast on Soundcloud, as well as iTunes, and Lorne and Lynette’s social media platforms for all the latest Culture Cast uploads and announcements.

Lorne Rubis is available @LorneRubis on Instagram, Twitter, LinkedIn and Facebook

Lynette Turner is available on Instagram, Facebook, LinkedIn as well as through her site, LynetteTurner.com.

We look forward to sharing Season 3 of Culture Cast: Conversations on Culture and Leadership with you every Wednesday. 

Culture Cast – The Best Leaders Empower Teams with Autonomy

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In Season 3, Episode 4, Lorne and Lynette discuss how the best leaders encourage autonomy, and know when to “stay out of the weeds.” By painting a very clear picture of their expectations, and offering “pop up” coaching along the way, leaders can play a vital role in building confidence and a sense of accomplishment in their employees. 

Please feel free to subscribe to this YouTube channel, follow this podcast on Soundcloud, as well as iTunes, and Lorne and Lynette’s social media platforms for all the latest Culture Cast uploads and announcements.

Lorne Rubis is available @LorneRubis on Instagram, Twitter, LinkedIn and Facebook

Lynette Turner is available on Instagram, Facebook, LinkedIn as well as through her site, LynetteTurner.com.

We look forward to sharing Season 3 of Culture Cast: Conversations on Culture and Leadership with you every Wednesday. 

Lead in With Lorne – What People First Really Means

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We invite you to take a couple minutes to watch/listen to our new podcast, Lead In with Lorne: A Leadership Story to Start Off Your Week.

This week, Lorne introduces what it really means to be People First in your organization, and how that ultimately helps better connect you with your customers and shareholders. It’s the most electric Lead In With Lorne yet.

Enjoy it on the YouTube video embedded below, or audio listeners can hear it on SoundCloud now too (iTunes coming in the near future). We hope it enriches your Monday

Kindly subscribe to the YouTube channel and SoundCloud to make sure you start your week with a leadership story. 

Lorne Rubis is available @LorneRubis on Instagram, Twitter, LinkedIn and Facebook

Leadership Practice is a Joke!

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Story: A priest, a minister, an imam and a rabbi walk into a bar. The bartender says, “What is this? A joke?”

Ok, I think that joke is funny for a number of reasons, and over the years I’ve learned how hard it is to effectively deliver one. I have so much respect for great stand up comedians because most work exceptionally hard on their acts. I was just listening to an NPR interview with comedian Ken Jeong (you probably recognize him from The Hangover movies). He commented that it “can take 10 years to really write 10 good minutes.” Even when he’s headlining in main rooms, Jeong sneaks off to casinos, open mics, and smaller stand up venues to hear the “up and comers” and fine tune his material. His comedy appears spontaneous but like other memorable performances, it’s totally planned and all about practice, practice, practice.

The Problem: Too many leaders are unconscious about the process of leading. It is separate from title or a job skill. Leadership is a craft, and doesn’t happen by accident for the great ones. So what if all leaders kept exercising and honing their abilities for their role, like the best entertainers or athletes do? There are some common processes every formal leader has to do, regardless of the organization size, market, business model, etc. For example, every leader has to set a course or direction. Everyone in this role needs to coach others. Teaching, recognizing, hiring and firing are all leadership processes that can be practiced.

The Solution: Consider leadership as a craft and give thought to the merit of practicing it. Like the very best at anything, never accept good enough or unpredictable variation of your leadership performance as acceptable.

If this information is helpful, here’s how you might apply it:

  1. Just start with one leadership practice (like coaching), outline the steps for doing it well, and practice. Go from there. 
  2. Just for fun, let’s check out Jeong’s Netflix special (Full disclosure: I haven’t seen it yet, but the trailer suggests it’s for mature audiences).

– Lorne

One Millennial View: Leaders should be aware that their employees are learning both positives and negatives from them as well, whether they’re trying to be mentors or not. If a leader is practicing, adjusting and and applying new processes, they’re simultaneously teaching these actions. If leaders operate with the “if it ain’t broke don’t fix it” mindset, then that gets passed along too. So, if coach doesn’t go to practice, neither do the players. 

– Garrett

Blog 967

Edited and published by Garrett Rubis

 

Culture Cast – Deliver High Impact ‘Town Hall’ Meetings in the Workplace

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In Season 3, Episode 2, Lorne and Lynette ask how might they deliver high impact, improve engagement, community and transparency during town hall meetings in organizations. Here are some ideas how to reinvent town halls to increase better facilitation and more meaningful participation from all leaders and employees.

Please feel free to subscribe to this YouTube channel, follow this podcast on Soundcloud, as well as iTunes, and Lorne and Lynette’s social media platforms for all the latest Culture Cast uploads and announcements.

Lorne Rubis is available @LorneRubis on Instagram, Twitter, LinkedIn and Facebook

Lynette Turner is available on Instagram, Facebook, LinkedIn as well as through her site, LynetteTurner.com.

We look forward to sharing Season 3 of Culture Cast: Conversations on Culture and Leadership with you every Wednesday. 

Be Humble Going Forward and Smart Looking Backwards!

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Story: I’m enjoying sharing the learnings accumulated in how to build a great culture. I outline 10 necessary elements to really make a culture move forward. Truth be told, the only way I could really map out this framework was having the time to look backwards. When we were creating and building the culture at the last organization I was at, it felt more like a drunken hermit crab heading north on a wide, sandy beach. We staggered, always pivoted, reversed occasionally, yet ultimately passed key milestones. Often it was more luck than brains, and we also made very conscious choices that were instrumental. Along the way, while tactics changed daily, we never wavered off going “north.”

Frankly, we humans are not very good at predicting, but we’re quite skilled at “retrospectively rationalizing” to explain why a business, project, or product succeeded or failed. Apple co-founder Steve Jobs stated during his 2008 Stanford commencement address: “You can’t connect the dots looking forward, only looking backward.”

Key Point: I’m all for planning and recognize the importance of forward looking detail. However, often the very best plans have to change before the ink is dry. Our most important attribute then becomes the ability to adapt and pivot. The same principle applies to starting new organizations. “It’s almost always the case that the greatest firms are discovered and not planned,” says William P. Barnett, a Professor of Business Leadership, Strategy, and Organizations at Stanford’s Graduate School of Business. That’s one conclusion from a study Barnett co-authored with colleague Elizabeth G. Pontikes of the University of Chicago. They studied entrepreneurial success rates by researching 4,566 organizations in 456 different market categories over 12 years, and found that entrepreneurs who were willing to adapt their vision and products to find the right market often did the best.

Actions you can take:

  1. Be fearless about pivoting. Stay true to your core purpose and values. However, be prepared to constantly adapt along the way.
  2. Be a great listener and humbly prepared to change tactics and strategy constantly. This is courageous rather than wishy washy leadership. Leave looking smart to when you’re connecting the dots in retrospect.

The wandering path in Leadership,

Lorne

One Millennial View: I guess there’s a reason why a book called “How to Build a Perfect Successful Company in One Try” doesn’t exist. Name an organization or product that has stayed completely the same since you started following them. I can’t think of one. Heck, by the time I finish editing this blog, there will likely be an update for the WordPress used to publish it.

– Garrett

Blog 960

Edited and published by Garrett Rubis