Lead In With Lorne – Why Having Fun at Work is so Vital

Personal leadership Podcast

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In this episode of Lead In With Lorne, we’re discussing the importance of having fun at work. In the aftermath of April Fool’s Day, Lorne shares his story of pranking a group of professionals during his recent experience at Unreasonable Future 2019, their reaction, and how incorporating laughter and fun in your organizations helps create successful environments.

Enjoy it on the YouTube video embedded below, or audio listeners can hear it on SoundCloud now too (iTunes coming in the near future). We hope it enriches your Monday!

Kindly subscribe to the YouTube channel and SoundCloud to make sure you start your week with a leadership story. 

Lorne Rubis is available @LorneRubis on Instagram, Twitter, LinkedIn and Facebook

Hot Topic Friday: April 5 Newsletter

Abundance Accountability Personal leadership Respect

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Happy Friday everyone! Here are some Hot Topics that caught my attention this week.

Hot Topic 1: Stop Asking Kids What They Want to be When They Grow Up.

Source: NYT and Adam Grant (Wharton professor and one of my favorite folks). 

What its About: Asking kids to define what kind of career or job they want versus the type of person they can become, may cause unnecessary angst. The world of work and career is continuously transforming in front of us. Adults may not even know what becoming a doctor, lawyer, astronaut (etc.) even means, let alone asking the young what they want to do. Focusing on this question can mess kids up in terms of what’s most important relative to personal aspirations?

Why its Important: Grant highlights three concerns with the “…be when you grow up?” question: “When we define ourselves by our jobs, our worth depends on what we achieve; Although having a calling can be a source of joy, research shows that searching for one leaves students feeling lost and confused; careers rarely live up to childhood dreams.” Becoming a wonderful human being and successful whole person on the other hand, calls for different and perhaps better questions. As Grant concludes: “I’m all for encouraging youngsters to aim high and dream big. But take it from someone who studies work for a living: Those aspirations should be bigger than work. Asking kids what they want to be leads them to claim a career identity they might never want to earn. Instead, invite them to think about what kind of person they want to be — and about all the different things they might want to do.”

Hot Topic 2: Procrastination is Not About Self-Control.

Source: Charlotte Lieberman.

What it’s About: Why do we procrastinate and what can we do about it? Lieberman does a superb job digging into this question. It’s not as straightforward as simply having more self-control. According to the article: “‘It’s self-harm,’ notes Dr. Piers Steel, a professor of motivational psychology at the University of Calgary and the author of ‘The Procrastination Equation: How to Stop Putting Things Off and Start Getting Stuff Done.’ People engage in this irrational cycle of chronic procrastination because of an inability to manage negative moods around a task.”

Why it’s Important: I believe procrastination is a stinker of a problem for many of us. In fact, we procrastinate while learning why we procrastinate. Putting off stuff we know needs to get done makes us feel lousy, and gets in the way of forward movement. The research emphasizes: “We must realize that, at its core, procrastination is about emotions, not productivity. The solution doesn’t involve downloading a time-management app or learning new strategies for self-control. It has to do with managing our emotions in a new way.” Read the article for other great suggestions. Or, you know, you could just put it off?

Hot Topic 3: Newly Elected Mayor Makes History in Chicago. 

Source: Chicago Tribune and Bill Ruthhart

What it’s About: Lori Lightfoot becomes both the first African-American woman and openly gay person elected mayor of Chicago, and in doing so, hammered the political establishment that has reigned over City Hall for decades.

Why it’s Important: This is not a political newsletter. It’s about culture and leadership. So I want to emphasize the important victory for inclusivity in a top leadership role; what the world needs more of. As Lightfoot exclaimed post winning: “A lot of little boys and girls are out there watching us tonight, and they’re seeing the beginning of something, well, a little bit different… They’re seeing a city reborn, a city where it doesn’t matter what color you are, where it surely doesn’t matter how tall you are and where it doesn’t matter who you love, just as long as you love with all your heart.” The other reason it’s important is that we learn more about what drives real transformation and that is ENERGY. Neutral ambivalence rarely causes meaningful change. High positive or negative energy does. People in Chicago felt high levels of negative energy towards their political establishment.

And finally! Here’s Cecil’s Bleat of the Week!

Modern technology certainly has made life easier, but it’s also made it easy for people to isolate themselves from opposing views, critical thought and even each other.” – Douglas Rushkoff, Team Human.

Bye for now!

– Lorne Rubis

Incase you missed it:

Monday’s Lead In podcast.

Tuesday’s blog.

Wednesday’s Culture Cast podcast.

Also don’t forget to subscribe to our site, and follow Lorne Rubis on Instagram, LinkedIn, Facebook and Twitter for the latest from our podcasts, blogs, and all things offered on LorneRubis.com.

Culture Cast – Why Storytelling at Work is so Important

Personal leadership Podcast

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In season 3, episode 9, Lorne and Lynette discuss the importance of storytelling to make WOW statements and accomplish your objectives in your professional and personal lives.

It’s tough to convince people by just providing the data. It’s much more effective when you can relay the information through an emotional connection by crafting a memorable story.

From Bill Gates exposing his TED Talk audience to actual mosquitoes while sharing his story on curing malaria, to countless presentations that present compelling data alongside great stories that really hit home. How can you better utilize storytelling to accomplish your objectives and goals on a professional and personal level?

Please feel free to subscribe to this YouTube channel, follow this podcast on Soundcloud, as well as iTunes, and Lorne and Lynette’s social media platforms for all the latest Culture Cast uploads and announcements.

Lorne Rubis is available @LorneRubis on Instagram, Twitter, LinkedIn and Facebook

Lynette Turner is available on Instagram, Facebook, LinkedIn as well as through her site, LynetteTurner.com.

We look forward to sharing Season 3 of Culture Cast: Conversations on Culture and Leadership with you every Wednesday. 

How Long Will You or Your Job Last?

Abundance Accountability Personal leadership Respect

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The Problem: There is a massive transformation of work underway, and too many people are on the sidelines watching. I’m honored to be contributing at the Unreasonable Group’s Future Conference for selected entrepreneurs and mentors. Companies that can scale to address the world’s biggest problems are here, and there are a number committed to addressing the fact that talent is universal, but success in matching to opportunity is often restricted. They are building powerful platforms to take the issue head on.

Story: Employers are feeling the urgency of not having enough workers with digital competence, including but not limited to data scientists, developers, software engineers, social media experts, and much more. They also want people with more refined “soft” skills that reflect high EQ to compliment digital competence. Government is recognizing that necessary employment policy may be lagging. Traditional education is slow to respond and not very creative overall. People are fearful that their jobs will be displaced by machines and/or become irrelevant. They are right. And new jobs are emerging very quickly without people to step up.

Today I worked on a prototype that would be like Spotify for upskilling or reskilling. It was a cool example of how platforms like this are going to transform our continuous drive and need for everyone to upskill and/or reskill.

What we can do about it?

  1. Recognize that NO job or person is immune, and consciously invest in upskilling or reskilling.
  2. Consider reinventing yourself with urgency.
  3. Look to leading organizations/solutions that may be unorthodox. Go to where the jobs are going to be and squire the requisite skills ASAP!

Think big, start small, act now.

– Lorne

One Millennial View: I often think about how the curriculum at the journalism school I attended is likely 80 or 90 percent different now than when I graduated in 2009. It’s a little scary to know that hundreds of much younger students are learning skills that we didn’t even know about back then. Although I don’t have access to their learnings exactly, it’s part of my job to educate and reskill myself as much as possible so I can continue to compete.

– Garrett

Blog 978

Edited and published by Garrett Rubis

 

Lead In With Lorne – Stop Guessing and Try it Out Fast

Personal leadership Podcast

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In this episode of Lead In With Lorne, I’m here at 1440 Multiversity in Santa Cruz, CA, where I had the privilege of hearing from Google X co-founder Tom Chi. His message was: Have less guess-a-thons at work, and don’t only hear from the highest title or loudest contributor attending our meetings. Instead, find the bright spot, and have the mindset to try things out and prototype as fast as possible. It’s less about failing fast, and more about learning fast. Take the guessing out, prototype something as fast as you can, in hours rather than weeks or months.

Enjoy it on the YouTube video embedded below, or audio listeners can hear it on SoundCloud now too (iTunes coming in the near future). We hope it enriches your Monday

Kindly subscribe to the YouTube channel and SoundCloud to make sure you start your week with a leadership story. 

Lorne Rubis is available @LorneRubis on Instagram, Twitter, LinkedIn and Facebook

Hot Topic Friday: March, 29 Newsletter

Abundance Accountability Personal leadership Respect

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Happy Friday everyone! Here are some Hot Topics that caught my attention this week.

Hop Topic 1: Hilton Named No. 1 Company on Fortune’s 100 Best Companies to Work For List

What it’s About:

Fortune published its Best Companies list. Check out the following from Hilton President and CEO, Chris Nassetta. He notes, “We lost our way a bit…We forgot that we are a business of people serving people, and the corporate environment got very disconnected from the front line.”  Under Nassetta’s guidance, Hilton launched an expansive program to upgrade “back-of-house” areas used by staff, and introduced many other employee focused changes.

Why it’s Important:

Organizations sustainably thrive when they really get the people side of the business right. With the stock up 274 percent from its IPO price in 2013, you gotta believe that Hilton’s investors are cheering the employee-first philosophy the hotel has executed on. Every organization can learn from what the great ones do. The Top 100 Best Companies to Work For list offers a roadmap to become culturally and financially better.

Hot Topic 2: Human Contact is Now Considered a Luxury

What it’s About:  

Reporter Nellie Bowles points out that screens used to be exclusive to the elite. Nowadays, avoiding them is a status symbol and makes the argument that human contact is rapidly becoming a luxury good. She shares a “WTF” story of a 68-year-old lonely man, whose life is emotionally richer through his relationship with a virtual, avatar cat named Sox that lives on his tablet. It’s what he can afford. At the opposite end of the rich scale, and in unabashed irony, the wealthy of Silicon Valley are paying huge dollars to send kids to screen-free schools.

Why it’s Important:

I do not want to minimize or judge the special relationship between a virtual cat named Sox (being controlled from a remote destination), and the “master” human being sitting on a couch. However, when human contact becomes something for the rich only, we might have a BIG problem. Work, although allowing for much more remote and gig experiences, must make room for our human need to be with each other. Let’s keep an eye on this trend.

Hot Topic 3: WeWork Loses Billions and is Excited About It

What it’s About:

The co-working company disclosed on Monday that its losses more than doubled last year to about $1.9 billion, even as its total revenue also expanded to about $1.8 billion. It will not slow down it’s breakneck, worldwide growth and the President, Artie Minson, believes it can get profitable as it needs to. The company also feels it can withstand a recession because organizations will move to more variable space commitments; WeWork’s wheelhouse. In eight years, it has grown to a company valued at $42 Billion USD with 401,000 paying members. Wow!

Why it’s Important: 

This underscores the reality of the gig economy and signals the way many organizations are re-thinking the physical work space. My co-author Garrett worked in a WeWork space in LA and asked in a previous blog, “What if many traditional organizations like post-secondary institutions started using space like the ones offered by WeWork?” Hmm.

And finally! Here’s Cecil’s Bleat of the Week!

“Today’s leaders must be willing to take on the job of driving fear out of the organization to create the conditions for learning, innovation, and growth” – Amy C. Edmondson, from her book, The Fearless Organization

Bye for now!

– Lorne Rubis

Incase you missed it:

Monday’s Lead In podcast.

Tuesday’s blog.

Wednesday’s Culture Cast podcast.

Also don’t forget to subscribe to our site, and follow Lorne Rubis on Instagram, LinkedIn, Facebook and Twitter for the latest from our podcasts, blogs, and all things offered on LorneRubis.com.