Lead In With Lorne – Thank Someone For Their Contribution

Personal leadership Podcast

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Welcome to another Lead In With Lorne. This week discusses the importance of recognizing and taking the time to thank people for their contribution to your organization. Let’s say thank you to those who have made a major impact over the years. 

Enjoy it on the YouTube video embedded below, or audio listeners can hear it on SoundCloud now too. We hope it enriches your Monday!

Kindly subscribe to the YouTube channel and SoundCloud to make sure you start your week with a leadership story.

Lorne Rubis is available @LorneRubis on Instagram, Twitter, LinkedIn and Facebook.

Hot Topic Friday: July 19

Friday Newsletter Personal leadership

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Happy Friday! Here are my July 19 Hot Topics and how they relate to advancing leadership or culture.

Hot Topic 1: Is Your Organization Adaptive or Maladaptive?

Source: Psychology Today. 

What It’s About: This article notes: “Healthy or ‘good’ adaptation might be exemplified by the person who appropriately adjusts his or her behavior to the requirements and expectations of a new supervisor in the workplace, or by the person who becomes physically disabled and develops new ways of coping and compensating for the loss of a completely healthy body.”  This idea can be connected to organizations as well. Healthy adaptation involves finding a way to move the organization forward. Difficulties arise when efforts to adapt serve to intensify a problem rather than to ease or resolve it. This may lead to what is known as maladapting. Organizations do this too. Grit, resilience and other well-intended values sometimes underscore very unhealthy behavior. 

Why It’s Important: Leaders want people to adapt. However, embracing new behavior and skills is fundamentally different than simply coping. Putting up with something is very different from truly adjusting and reskilling or upskilling. As the article concludes: “Rather than maladapting by adjusting, tolerating, or enduring unacceptable circumstances or conditions, healthy adapting is sometimes best achieved by changing something.” Make adaptation a healthy, forward process rather than a coping mechanism. 

Hot Topic 2: Boeing’s Dangerous Culture Challenge. 

Source: The New York Times

What It’s About: I appreciate Boeing builds complex aircraft. And we should all be grateful for what they’ve done to make the world more accessible to those of us that ride their product. Still, something is fundamentally wrong with their culture and leadership. For example, Boeing’s first public statements after the crash of the Indonesian 737 Max 8, supported by the F.A.A., questioned the abilities of the pilots, even though subsequent reporting has shown that pilots were not given the information they needed to properly react to the aircraft’s unexpected descents. Only after the crash of the second Max 8 in Ethiopia, did Boeing acknowledge that software in the planes’ cockpits played a major role in both accidents. This article points out that Boeing has repeated this pattern of deflection and avoidance. Have they really learned how to constructively manage situations like this based on self-accountability. Do they really care about the tragic impact to people everywhere? Or do their lawyers, risk managers, and spin doctors lead the way with the primary objective of protecting Boeing at the expense of the greater good? 

Why It’s Important: It is unreasonable to expect perfection in machines, people and process. And in highly complex machines like aircraft, the reality is that there are so many parts, we should expect reasonable (not perfect) outcomes. Ideally of course, defects are not fatal. What we should be able to expect 100 percent of the time is transparency, honesty and integrity from Boeing’s leadership. Do not spin to minimize exposure. You owe it to your customers, employees and shareholders to be brutally honest and commit to learning fast. The first response should be what you’re doing about resolving the situation rather than blaming others. Beyond the loss of precious life, Boeing’s performance on this matter has squandered hundreds of millions of dollars in shareholder value. What worries me even more is that some group of experts knew about the flaws and found it too difficult to speak up or be heard! Why is that? What about the Boeing culture prevents fatal flaws getting addressed up stream? Something is missing. It starts at the top. 

My Weekly Wine Recommendation (Thanks to Vivino):

Verdon Estate Reserve No. 3 Cabernet Sauvignon Rutherford 2014. 

[Picture and ratings provided by Vivino.]

And finally! Here’s Cecil’s Bleat of the Week!

“You are not alone. Just because you feel like s*it, doesn’t mean you are s*it.”Jerry Colonna

Bye for now!

– Lorne Rubis

Incase you Missed It:

Monday’s Lead In podcast.

Tuesday’s blog.

Season 3 of Culture Cast

Also don’t forget to subscribe to our site, and follow Lorne Rubis on Instagram, LinkedIn, Facebook and Twitter for the latest from our podcasts, blogs, and all things offered on LorneRubis.com.

Zoom Out and Back For Bad Ass Greatness 

Abundance Accountability Personal leadership Respect

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The Challenge: There are a few issues I have with setting yearly business objectives in traditional ways. First of all, they are often incremental, even tepid. This is related to the management technique of “sandbagging,” usually related to ensuring individual bonuses are earned. The second is they can simultaneously lead to somewhere, yet nowhere. I hate “floaters” – things that have a beginning and end, yet do little to connect to a greater purpose. Furthermore, these goals can become rigid with people driving to just finish when the outcome is of little importance. Rather than consciously pivoting, because the context has changed, we stay in the rut until it ends.  

So What Do I Do About It? I like setting 10x goals that are based on zooming out years ahead in the spirit of becoming hugely aspirational. This stretches out everyone big time! So then when people come back to the present and determine steps towards these big goals, the yearly work is bolder and more meaningful. It is a bad ass way of working, and a lot more fun. I challenge you to try it. 

Think BIG, start small, act now. 

– Lorne 

One Millennial View: Who doesn’t want to have a bad ass way of thinking and approaching work and goals? I realize this is more of a challenge, but unless you’re working as a mattress salesperson, comfort shouldn’t be part of the experience. 

– Garrett

Blog 993

Edited and published by Garrett Rubis

Lead In With Lorne – The Fight Against Sameness

Personal leadership Podcast

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Welcome to another Lead In With Lorne, this week we’re discussing the fight against sameness. How are we diligently different in our marketplace? If we’re really trying to 10x ourselves, why are we just attempting to emulate another company in our same market that seems to be doing things right? Oh, and in the spirit of being different, we’re coming at you from a loud, crowded airport. Fight against being the same. 

Enjoy it on the YouTube video embedded below, or audio listeners can hear it on SoundCloud now too. We hope it enriches your Monday!

Kindly subscribe to the YouTube channel and SoundCloud to make sure you start your week with a leadership story.

Lorne Rubis is available @LorneRubis on Instagram, Twitter, LinkedIn and Facebook.

Hot Topics Friday: July 12

Friday Newsletter Personal leadership

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Happy Friday! Here are my July 12 Hot Topics and how they relate to advancing leadership or culture.

Hot Topic 1: They Will Leave by the Door or Window.

Source: The New York Times

What It’s About: The title above is an unfortunate statement made by France Télécom’s CEO a decade ago. This is a grim and extreme example of a company not adapting to rapidly shifting market forces, and the horrifying impact of management and culture floundering in a state of desperation. France Télécom was caught off guard by the digital revolution, and by 2005, it was over $50 million in debt. Company executives believed they needed to get rid of 22,000 out of 130,000 workers to ensure survival. The country’s law is highly restrictive relative to layoffs. Since many Télécom workers were state employees, they had lifelong job security.

For those employees the company could not fire, the executives alledgely resolved to make life so unbearable, that the workers would be forced to leave. According to the article, at least 35 employees — workers’ advocates say nearly double that number — committed suicide, feeling trapped, betrayed and fearful of ever finding new work in France’s immobile labor market.” Seven members of top the executive team during that time period, starting with the CEO, are currently on trial for “moral harassment.” (Frankly, if allegations noted in this article are true, the actions taken are so despicable the execs should go to jail). 

Why It’s Important: This happened a little more than 10 years ago. Market disruption is way more fierce and violent now, and about to become even more turbulent. It is likely that organizations, as nimble as they might be, will get caught flat-footed by a game changer. This may take the form of AI, machine learning, a whole new business model, or a myriad of combinations relative to exponential technology. Although most jurisdictions are not saddled with French employment law, and unions are now far less influential, social media can spin up outrage overnight. Boards and management must be thinking and planning for big workforce changes now, rather than finding themselves sitting in a puddle of desperation. The term “moral harassment” may evolve to cover irresponsible leadership relative to ensuring an adaptive culture! 

Hot Topic 2: Can You Inspire an Audience? 

Source: Forbes

What It’s About: Carmine Gallo is a genius on the topic of story telling. His book, “The Story Teller’s Secret” was a compulsory read for my last executive team. In this article, Gallo refers to “Vital Speeches of the Day,” an organization that distributes awards for the best speech writers and speakers who inspire their audiences. The committee of professional speechwriters who judge the submissions keep the following question top of mind: Could the speech have been delivered by any other speaker, to any other audience, at any other time in history? If the answer is “no,” then it has the makings of a fine speech. 

Why It’s Important: People want authentic personal connection more than ever. And whenever we are talking to people, whether as a speaker or in a meeting, our ability to tell a story and inspire differentiates us by the added value we give. I wish I would have understood this earlier in my career. It is a practiced art. One does not have to be the CEO or even a supervisor to be a storyteller. We all can be inspiring if we give real thought to our message. Don’t waste the opportunity! 

My Weekly Wine Recommendation (Thanks to Vivino):

Triseatum Pinot Noir Willamette Valley 2016

[Picture and ratings provided by Vivino.]

And finally! Here’s Cecil’s Bleat of the Week!

“Managers light a fire under people. Leaders light a fire in people.” – Kathy Austin. 

Bye for now!

– Lorne Rubis

Incase you Missed It:

Monday’s Lead In podcast.

Tuesday’s blog.

Season 3 of Culture Cast

Also don’t forget to subscribe to our site, and follow Lorne Rubis on Instagram, LinkedIn, Facebook and Twitter for the latest from our podcasts, blogs, and all things offered on LorneRubis.com.

Asking For and Giving Straight Talk! 

Abundance Accountability Personal leadership Respect

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The Challenge: One of the cliches of business is: “We need to have better communication.” Who can argue with this ultimate “motherhood” statement? Still, people are weary of worn out, top down communication and management spin. They don’t typically want the polished and carefully worded “speak” from the marketing department. Frankly, when they see an executive post or email, the data says that up to 80 percent of recipients tend to discount the message at best, or ignore at worst. So what can a leaders do about it? 

What I Think People Want: Streaming technology allows us to talk to people in real time from anywhere the internet is accessible. Applications like YouTube Live, Skype, Zoom, Google Meets, Microsoft Teams, and more, give us a platform to have immediate and authentic conversations. In my last organization, I would live stream on various topics with internal or external guests every Friday. It was optional for people to join the conversation, yet we would average nearly 500 people every live session. The episodes were recorded and many more watched/listened to the playback at a more convenient time. I humbly also understood that the community didn’t show up just for my guest or me. They collected on the platform because they became part of the message. The chat was every bit as important or perhaps even more significant. The online participants answered each other’s questions, virtually gave “high fives,” posted great points, editorialized, and much more. It became a communication potpourri of what was relevant to the audience. 

In my new role and organization I’m going to do this even better. Every Wednesday, starting in the fall, anyone in the organization who wants to know what’s going on and/or desires to express a view is going to be invited. I expect this live stream, in its raw, open, uncluttered, transparent way, will take us all to a higher version in becoming one team. I’m going to tell it like I see it and expect the same from everyone. 

Could you livestream with your teams or in your organization? Do it! It’s all upside if you’re real and don’t spin. Trust the audience. They’re worth it. 

Think Big, Start Small, Act Now! 

Lorne 

One Millennial View: How cool is that? As mentioned above, we all have the resources to connect and have a free platform. I’m a giant fan of listening to valuable content, and if your organization can have a voice, why not let it ring with full transparency? Best of luck. 

– Garrett 

Blog 992

Edited and published by Garrett Rubis