Lead in With Lorne – Walking by the Birds#i*

Personal leadership Podcast

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In this episode of Lead in With Lorne, the topic is “walking by the birds#i*.” It’s a fun but valuable story regarding the think big, start small, act NOW lesson. We all have birds#i* that we’re walking by every day, but this week is an opportunity to finally clean it up. Watch/listen to get the full story.

Think big, start small, act now.

Enjoy it on the YouTube video embedded below, or audio listeners can hear it on SoundCloud now too (iTunes coming in the near future). We hope it enriches your Monday

Kindly subscribe to the YouTube channel and SoundCloud to make sure you start your week with a leadership story. 

Lorne Rubis is available @LorneRubis on Instagram, Twitter, LinkedIn and Facebook

The Ally Blog Causes Sparks to Fly!

Abundance Accountability Personal leadership Respect

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The problem: “Black workers at UPS facility in Ohio faced decades of racial hostility, lawsuit says.” That’s a March, 2019 USA Today headline. “Survey reveals Canada still has a ways to go on workplace discrimination.” That quote is from the Globe and Mail, in case our Canadian audience thinks they have the high ground. Hey, let’s just admit we still have a lot of work to do on the complex challenges related to inclusion and equality. Even as I’m writing this blog, a CNN panel is noting that celebrity democratic candidate, Beto O’Rourke, ticked off a lot of women with his comment about his “thanking his for wife feeding the children at home.” So for the eye rollers out there who are tired of the topic, we DO need to continue the conversation.

Story: As I noted in my previous blog, we are all at different stages on the inclusion learning path relative to what being an Ally is. Garrett and I got some strong reactions relative to the topic. Two of our readers seem to be on different bends in the road. Reader 1: “I’m aware of the stories of people being mistreated and undervalued, but it would be a flat out lie if I’ve said I’ve ever seen it practiced or celebrated first hand. I’m lucky I haven’t been part of it, but it would be disingenuous for me to pretend I’ve seen it.” Reader 2: “To be a true ally, you have to be able to step out of your experience. You cannot say that just because you haven’t experienced it that it doesn’t exist or is a non-issue.”

What we can do about it?

I asked ATB Financial’s Rachel Wade, Director of Equity and Inclusion for her insight . She shares her wise recommendations:

  1. “By being open to feedback and criticism of how we’ve held others up or failed to do so. It’s easy to become defensive. Try to pause and take in the new perspective before rejecting it – even if it stings a little. If you have the urge to respond with something that sounds like, ‘Well, not all <<insert demographic>> people are like that…’ You probably need to reflect a little longer on the sentiment behind the feedback. You are likely being given this feedback because you belong to a group that enjoys the downstream effects of systemic privilege. This is your time to acknowledge this new information and be a true ally.
  2. While allies can stand up for others they should not presume to to be able to take on the first-person voice of groups they don’t belong to first-hand. Don’t look for a pat on the back for being a good ally and make room for disadvantaged groups to speak for themselves.
  3. We can belong to both privileged and disadvantaged groups at the same time – this is where the intersectionality of of our lived experience and diversity becomes layered. In some ways we may be in need of allies and in some ways we may be able to be strong allies. Being disadvantaged in one way doesn’t mean you opt out of understanding the disadvantages of other lived experiences.”

Each of us is the “other” at sometime in our lives. It’s important to remind ourselves. Thank you Rachel.

Think Big, Start Small, Act Now!

Lorne

One Millennial View: Rachel’s insight says it best. I’m a person who likes to fix things, but I have to accept that there is no immediate remedy that’ll satisfy everyone. At least if there’s more awareness, then maybe it can reduce the anguish.

– Garrett

Blog 975

Edited and published by Garrett Rubis

 

Culture Cast – Have the Courage to Turn Chance Encounters into Powerful Moments

Personal leadership Podcast

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In season 3, episode 6, Lorne and Lynette discuss having the courage to turn chance encounters into powerful moments, even when we might second guess ourselves and let insecurities or shyness make us skip the opportunity.

Lorne tells the story of when he recently ran into Hockey Night in Canada’s Ron MacLean at an airport Starbucks, and refers to the Japanese saying, “ichigo ichie,” which translates to “one time, one meeting.” Although, Lorne thinks it’s “one encounter, one chance.” 

Still, the essence is the same. Try not to skip on chance encounters and powerful moments. 

Please feel free to subscribe to this YouTube channel, follow this podcast on Soundcloud, as well as iTunes, and Lorne and Lynette’s social media platforms for all the latest Culture Cast uploads and announcements.

Lorne Rubis is available @LorneRubis on Instagram, Twitter, LinkedIn and Facebook

Lynette Turner is available on Instagram, Facebook, LinkedIn as well as through her site, LynetteTurner.com.

We look forward to sharing Season 3 of Culture Cast: Conversations on Culture and Leadership with you every Wednesday. 

A Googler Perspective on What Being an ‘Ally’ Means

Abundance Accountability Personal leadership Respect

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Advancing the value of inclusion in organizations is the focus of a few key workshops and events at  SXSW 2019.  And as part of the ever evolving inclusion conversation, more attention is being paid to helping ALL of us better understand and apply the concept of “allyship.” Is that phrase being used more in your work community? It is in mine, and yet do we really understand what it means and when it is actually well practiced? I’d like to share what I personally learned about “allyship” from the SXSW session I attended.

Story: Our “allyship” facilitator was Kyle Alicurrently a Google executive, and a black man who grew up in the suburbs of Chicago. He remarked that when he left university, he had a self-acclaimed, well-developed perspective on all that was “blackness.” Or so he thought. Turns out, his first teaching job in the center of Baltimore altered that view when one of the very first things a student asked him was, “Mr. Ali why do you look so much like Carlton (from the Fresh Prince of Bel Air)?”

via GIPHY

We all translate through an interpretive narrative based on our own unique experience and lenses. So becoming an ally for others is not something we can simply assume or self-proclaim. When we sit in an advantaged or privileged position, it is not sufficient to intellectually declare “allyship.” Although most of us who care about inclusion certainly have the best intentions, I believe there’s a lot more work to do in understanding what being an ally really means. The working definition of allyship presented by Googler Ali is as follows: “Acting for justice through the lens of one’s own membership in an advantaged group.”  I know from listening to the workshop discussion, attended by people obviously enlightened and deeply interested in the topic, that most of us have a lot more work to do on OURSELVES first before those outside our more privileged positions embrace us as genuine allies. That’s a humbling and important base to start from.

What we can do about this:  

According to Kyle Ali, with the help of Google’s research and progress on the topic, we will move forward as we:

  1. Become more self-aware of being a member in an advantaged group.
  2. Better understand what justice means for others outside this membership.
  3. Remember that the first three letters of allyship are “ALL.” Inclusion and allyship are easier concepts to wish for than really do. We must start with the hard work of better understanding ourselves to fully join the ALL.

Think big, start small, act now,

Lorne

One Millennial View: I think many Millennials, myself included, might respond with a big ole “duh, I know” when the topic of inclusion is discussed. I simply have never been in a professional situation where someone has been excluded for just “being” anything. That said, this isn’t a subject from a clickbait Buzzfeed article, it’s from a stage at SXSW with a lot of invested, interested participants. If we’ve already been told that we’re on the “allyship” train, that’s great, but it doesn’t hurt to stay learning and self-accountable to keep things on track.

– Garrett

Edited and published by Garrett Rubis

 

Lead In With Lorne – The Topic of Inclusion and Allyship at SXSW

Personal leadership Podcast

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Howdy from SXSW in Austin, Texas, where this week’s podcast has been influenced by some of the buzz, learnings and events I’ve attended over the weekend. It’s all in this new episode of Lead In with Lorne: A Leadership Story to Start Off Your Week.

While we’re likely familiar with inclusion, what do you know about the term, “allyship,” and how we can start thinking about it in the workplace? Watch this pod, or give it a listen, I’ll do my best to start the conversation. 

Enjoy it on the YouTube video embedded below, or audio listeners can hear it on SoundCloud now too (iTunes coming in the near future). We hope it enriches your Monday

Kindly subscribe to the YouTube channel and SoundCloud to make sure you start your week with a leadership story. 

Lorne Rubis is available @LorneRubis on Instagram, Twitter, LinkedIn and Facebook