Hot Topic Friday: August 16

Friday Newsletter Personal leadership

FlipboardTwitterLinkedInFacebook

 

 

Happy Friday! Here are my August 16 Hot Topics and how they relate to advancing culture or leadership.

Hot Topic 1: Why Do We Worry Then Worry Some More?  

Source: The New York Times.  

What It’s About: UCLA Clinical psychiatrist and author, Jennifer Taitz, writes about the negative impact of waiting for the “other shoe to drop,” and how this way of thinking robs us of fully appreciating moments of joy. We somehow believe that thinking of the next potential bad thing better prepares us for the worst. This is a false narrative. The article outlines why this happens and what we might do about it. 

Why It’s Important: We need to recognize, welcome and embrace moments of joy. When we start worrying about what bad things could possibly happen before we fully soak in moments to relish, the less capacity we have for resilience. Two important worry antidotes to keep in mind include: 1. Cherishing our values more than counting “results” and comparing ourselves to others 2. Imagining life without this anxiety and visualizing living in this more desirable state. This is easier said than done, yet worth practicing. 

Hot Topic 2: 27 Years of Research Finds One Key Thing for Long and Happy Life

Source: Inc. 

Why It’s About: A study was published in the Journal of the American Medical Association by a team of University of Michigan researchers. The team analyzed data from the 27-year-old Health and Retirement Study and found that one thing led to people living longer. According to the article: “That one thing is inescapably interwoven with happiness, fulfillment, and maximum productivity at work: Working and living with a sense of purpose and meaning. The researchers found that those who had meaning and a sense of purpose (as measured by answers to questions from well-being self-assessments) lived longer lives than those who’d self-reported little to no sense of purpose and meaning.”

Why It’s Important: Both individuals and organizations require a sense of deep purpose to thrive. Yet too often, neither fully invests in the work required to establish purpose and meaning as an intentional driving force. Why is that? We consistently let activity and transaction lead us without really asking the hard questions as to WHY? Being self-aware and reflective is difficult, yet as the research confirms, it is so valuable. What about you? 

My Weekly Wine Recommendation (Thanks to Vivino):

Rainwater Cabernet Sauvignon Rutherford 2017. 

[Picture and ratings provided by Vivino.]

And finally! Here’s Cecil’s Bleat of the Week!

“Our ability to truly tap into our creative imagination so that we can do the things that we most want to do, or experiment with different parts of our self, is truly unique to us – and an alter ego helps to untap that.” – Todd Herman 

Bye for now!

– Lorne Rubis

Incase you Missed It:

My Lead In podcasts

My latest blogs. (Blogs returning Tuesday, August 20). 

Season 3 of Culture Cast

Also don’t forget to subscribe to our site, and follow Lorne Rubis on Instagram, LinkedIn, Facebook and Twitter for the latest from our podcasts, blogs, and all things offered on LorneRubis.com.

Hot Topic Friday: August 9

Abundance Accountability Friday Newsletter Personal leadership Respect

FlipboardTwitterLinkedInFacebook

 

Happy Friday! Here are my August 9 Hot Topics and how they relate to advancing culture or leadership.

Hot Topic 1: Hunting for Easter Eggs All Year. 

Source: The New York Times. 

What It’s About: Do you know what an “Easter egg” is in the tech world? It is an undocumented feature in a production, set in motion by a sequence of commands that nobody would hit accidentally. Software engineers over the years have occasionally built in surprises for the user, who have to hunt for them. David Pogue’s article in the NYT gives an interesting outline of this phenomena. Using Tesla as an example, Easter eggs include but are not limited to: “Romance Mode (the screen in the car displays a crackling fireplace as a mood-setting pop song begins to play), Santa Mode (your car’s icon on the screen becomes a sleigh, snowflakes fall, and the turn signal produces the sound of jingle bells); and what Tesla engineers call Emissions Testing Mode (you, the driver, can trigger the sound of flatulence emerging from any of the car’s seats).” Apparently Tesla engineers have made Easter eggs easier to find, yet their cars still contain Easter eggs that nobody has yet discovered. Kinda cool. 

Why It’s Important:  We could all benefit from using our creativity for more intentional fun. What if we explored applying the Easter egg idea in the work we do (not just software development) so that we might surprise people who use our services in a delightful way? I’m not sure how yet, but I’m planning to do that. We’re building a new lornerubis.com website….Hmm. 

Hot Topic 2: Big Learning from 10,000 Leaders.

Source: Inc. 

What It’s About: This Inc. article refers to lessons learned from conducting coaching sessions with more than 10,000 organizational leaders across 300 companies in 75 different countries. The reflective analysis noticed three qualities the most effective leaders have in common:

They have a willingness to improve their leadership skills.

They play a game worth playing in life.

They have a desire to elevate those around them.. 

This totally connects with my observation about effective leaders. 

Why It’s Important: While there is an overwhelming amount of leadership content in the universe, these common traits are worth reflecting on and are accessible to ALL of us. Great leaders are never ever “done.” They are constantly pursuing greater self awareness and are intentional learning machines. I find that they think BIG and play BIG. Most importantly, advancing as leaders in life and work become one in the same mission. And the very best always develop and elevate others in the most generous way. They literally never waste time putting down others. They do eliminate or avoid toxicity and always look to bring people forward. This is a simple article and there is something important we can really learn from it.   

My Weekly Wine Recommendation (Thanks to Vivino):

Badge Proprietary Red Santa Barbara 2016

[Picture and ratings provided by Vivino.]

And finally! Here’s Cecil’s Bleat of the Week!

“A meal becomes good by starting with quality instructions. It becomes great when you add a quality chef.”Erica Ariel Fox

Bye for now!

– Lorne Rubis

Incase you Missed It:

My Lead In podcasts

My latest blogs

Season 3 of Culture Cast

Also don’t forget to subscribe to our site, and follow Lorne Rubis on Instagram, LinkedIn, Facebook and Twitter for the latest from our podcasts, blogs, and all things offered on LorneRubis.com.

Hot Topic Friday: August 2

Abundance Accountability Friday Newsletter Personal leadership Respect

FlipboardTwitterLinkedInFacebook

 

Happy Friday! Here are my August 2 Hot Topics and how they relate to advancing culture or leadership.

Hot Topic 1: Leadership Trust Falls.

Source: Harvard Business Review

What It’s About: This article underlines the importance of all stakeholders’ trusting leadership. Leaders who violate that trust usually end up getting fired: A recent PwC analysis shows that in 2018, more CEOs were fired for ethical lapses than poor financial performance. The authors note that stakeholders evaluate leadership trustworthiness on the following dimensions — competence, motives, means, impact and earned legitimacy. Those who believe leaders haven’t come to power properly will be less likely to follow their direction.

Why It’s Important: When the trust scores of leadership are low, research confirms that organizations underperform. Of course, competence and judgment in decision making is critical. And it’s imperative that people see the action of leadership aimed towards the greater good rather than feeding selfish interests. The means to results must have integrity, and leadership has to be seen as driving positive impact. Legitimacy underscores well earned experience, especially when it comes to navigating the future. Contrary to popular myth, people are not as resistant to change as they are distrustful of leaders being able to maneuver through it. Consider leadership trust as one very important measurement in your organization’s success. 

Hot Topic 2: Transparent Insights from Old Navy’s New CEO

Source: Fast Company

What It’s About: This simple but insightful article gives us a glimpse into the human side of Old Navy CEO Nancy Green. She answers questions like, “What do you do when you have a free five minutes?” “What products have you recently you splurged on?” “What’s your necessary vice?” And much more. 

Why It’s Important: People like to see the personal side of a leader. There is a craving for authenticity and humanness from top executives. It is this vulnerability that contributes to the trustworthiness noted in the article above. In this case, I particularly liked the books Green recommends. I read a lot of books, and I’ve only read one on her Top Five list. I’m committed and inspired to read the other four: 

Winning from Within by Erica Ariel Fox. 

Shoe Dog, by Phil Knight

Imagine It Forward: Courage, Creativity and the Power of Change, by Beth Comstock.

The Mind of the Leader: How to Lead Yourself, Your People, and Your Organization for Extraordinary Results, by Rasmus Hougaard and Jacqueline Carter

Becoming by Michelle Obama.

My Weekly Wine Recommendation (Thanks to Vivino):

Jury Cellars Cabernet Sauvignon Oakville 2017

[Picture and ratings provided by Vivino.]

And finally! Here’s Cecil’s Bleat of the Week!

“My number one goal as a thriller writer is to entertain you. But I’ve got a chance to not only entertain people, but have them close my book and be smarter having read it.”Brad Thor. 

Bye for now!

– Lorne Rubis

Incase you Missed It:

Monday’s Lead In podcast.

Tuesday’s blog.

Season 3 of Culture Cast

Also don’t forget to subscribe to our site, and follow Lorne Rubis on Instagram, LinkedIn, Facebook and Twitter for the latest from our podcasts, blogs, and all things offered on LorneRubis.com.

Hot Topic Friday: July 26

Abundance Accountability Friday Newsletter Personal leadership Respect

FlipboardTwitterLinkedInFacebook

 

Happy Friday! Here are my July 26 Hot Topics and how they relate to advancing leadership or culture.

Hot Topic 1: The Fight Against Evil Companies

Source: The New York Times.

What It’s About: “It took me a while to realize how evil this company was.” That’s a quote by Ed Bisch, who lost his 18-year-old son, Eddie, to an OxyContin overdose in 2001. Bisch was an early crusader against the dangers of Oxy. Years later, the world now knows just how dangerous this drug and other opioids is. Purdue Pharma, the company that made OxyContin, is in legal and financial jeopardy . (Although most observers believe the owners, the Sackler family, and company will never adequately pay for the harm they’ve caused). 

Why It’s Important: Until 2018, Google had a motto that a lot of people appreciated: “Don’t be evil.” Dropping it has been controversial. The fact is that sometimes, when market power prevails and the money gets so big, greed and avarice can take over. That’s why Boards of Directors and executive leadership must invest in a strong culture, where both purpose (that betters humankind) AND profit, (that sustains and reasonably rewards stakeholders) are equal partners. I’ve never had a serious conversation with anyone who wants to sell their soul to work for a company whose products intentionally hurt people, regardless of how big the paycheck. 

Hot Topic 2: Closing the Joy Gap at Work

Source: Harvard Business Review

What It’s About: Prominent consulting firm AT Kearney conducted a major survey relative to the concept of joy at work. Why? With all the massive upheaval driven by exponential change, being able to create conditions for joy is strategically meaningful. Still, their findings “point to a pronounced ‘joy gap’ at work. Nearly 90% of respondents said that they expect to experience a substantial degree of joy at work, yet only 37% report that such is their actual experience.”

Why It’s Important: This is another argument for intentional culture development. The survey suggests the importance of three big JOY drivers: Harmony, Impact and Acknowledgement. This makes a lot of sense and connects to a number of my 10 Key Elements. Creating conditions for JOY to erupt is worth investing in. What are you doing about it? 

My Weekly Wine Recommendation (Thanks to Vivino):

Kent Price Venant du Coeur Napa Valley 2012

[Picture and ratings provided by Vivino.]

And finally! Here’s Cecil’s Bleat of the Week!

“The best way to win at a game of chance is to remove chance from the equation.”Daniel Silva

Bye for now!

– Lorne Rubis

Incase you Missed It:

Monday’s Lead In podcast.

Tuesday’s blog.

Season 3 of Culture Cast

Also don’t forget to subscribe to our site, and follow Lorne Rubis on Instagram, LinkedIn, Facebook and Twitter for the latest from our podcasts, blogs, and all things offered on LorneRubis.com.

Hot Topic Friday: July 19

Friday Newsletter Personal leadership

FlipboardTwitterLinkedInFacebook

 

Happy Friday! Here are my July 19 Hot Topics and how they relate to advancing leadership or culture.

Hot Topic 1: Is Your Organization Adaptive or Maladaptive?

Source: Psychology Today. 

What It’s About: This article notes: “Healthy or ‘good’ adaptation might be exemplified by the person who appropriately adjusts his or her behavior to the requirements and expectations of a new supervisor in the workplace, or by the person who becomes physically disabled and develops new ways of coping and compensating for the loss of a completely healthy body.”  This idea can be connected to organizations as well. Healthy adaptation involves finding a way to move the organization forward. Difficulties arise when efforts to adapt serve to intensify a problem rather than to ease or resolve it. This may lead to what is known as maladapting. Organizations do this too. Grit, resilience and other well-intended values sometimes underscore very unhealthy behavior. 

Why It’s Important: Leaders want people to adapt. However, embracing new behavior and skills is fundamentally different than simply coping. Putting up with something is very different from truly adjusting and reskilling or upskilling. As the article concludes: “Rather than maladapting by adjusting, tolerating, or enduring unacceptable circumstances or conditions, healthy adapting is sometimes best achieved by changing something.” Make adaptation a healthy, forward process rather than a coping mechanism. 

Hot Topic 2: Boeing’s Dangerous Culture Challenge. 

Source: The New York Times

What It’s About: I appreciate Boeing builds complex aircraft. And we should all be grateful for what they’ve done to make the world more accessible to those of us that ride their product. Still, something is fundamentally wrong with their culture and leadership. For example, Boeing’s first public statements after the crash of the Indonesian 737 Max 8, supported by the F.A.A., questioned the abilities of the pilots, even though subsequent reporting has shown that pilots were not given the information they needed to properly react to the aircraft’s unexpected descents. Only after the crash of the second Max 8 in Ethiopia, did Boeing acknowledge that software in the planes’ cockpits played a major role in both accidents. This article points out that Boeing has repeated this pattern of deflection and avoidance. Have they really learned how to constructively manage situations like this based on self-accountability. Do they really care about the tragic impact to people everywhere? Or do their lawyers, risk managers, and spin doctors lead the way with the primary objective of protecting Boeing at the expense of the greater good? 

Why It’s Important: It is unreasonable to expect perfection in machines, people and process. And in highly complex machines like aircraft, the reality is that there are so many parts, we should expect reasonable (not perfect) outcomes. Ideally of course, defects are not fatal. What we should be able to expect 100 percent of the time is transparency, honesty and integrity from Boeing’s leadership. Do not spin to minimize exposure. You owe it to your customers, employees and shareholders to be brutally honest and commit to learning fast. The first response should be what you’re doing about resolving the situation rather than blaming others. Beyond the loss of precious life, Boeing’s performance on this matter has squandered hundreds of millions of dollars in shareholder value. What worries me even more is that some group of experts knew about the flaws and found it too difficult to speak up or be heard! Why is that? What about the Boeing culture prevents fatal flaws getting addressed up stream? Something is missing. It starts at the top. 

My Weekly Wine Recommendation (Thanks to Vivino):

Verdon Estate Reserve No. 3 Cabernet Sauvignon Rutherford 2014. 

[Picture and ratings provided by Vivino.]

And finally! Here’s Cecil’s Bleat of the Week!

“You are not alone. Just because you feel like s*it, doesn’t mean you are s*it.”Jerry Colonna

Bye for now!

– Lorne Rubis

Incase you Missed It:

Monday’s Lead In podcast.

Tuesday’s blog.

Season 3 of Culture Cast

Also don’t forget to subscribe to our site, and follow Lorne Rubis on Instagram, LinkedIn, Facebook and Twitter for the latest from our podcasts, blogs, and all things offered on LorneRubis.com.

Hot Topics Friday: July 12

Friday Newsletter Personal leadership

FlipboardTwitterLinkedInFacebook

 

Happy Friday! Here are my July 12 Hot Topics and how they relate to advancing leadership or culture.

Hot Topic 1: They Will Leave by the Door or Window.

Source: The New York Times

What It’s About: The title above is an unfortunate statement made by France Télécom’s CEO a decade ago. This is a grim and extreme example of a company not adapting to rapidly shifting market forces, and the horrifying impact of management and culture floundering in a state of desperation. France Télécom was caught off guard by the digital revolution, and by 2005, it was over $50 million in debt. Company executives believed they needed to get rid of 22,000 out of 130,000 workers to ensure survival. The country’s law is highly restrictive relative to layoffs. Since many Télécom workers were state employees, they had lifelong job security.

For those employees the company could not fire, the executives alledgely resolved to make life so unbearable, that the workers would be forced to leave. According to the article, at least 35 employees — workers’ advocates say nearly double that number — committed suicide, feeling trapped, betrayed and fearful of ever finding new work in France’s immobile labor market.” Seven members of top the executive team during that time period, starting with the CEO, are currently on trial for “moral harassment.” (Frankly, if allegations noted in this article are true, the actions taken are so despicable the execs should go to jail). 

Why It’s Important: This happened a little more than 10 years ago. Market disruption is way more fierce and violent now, and about to become even more turbulent. It is likely that organizations, as nimble as they might be, will get caught flat-footed by a game changer. This may take the form of AI, machine learning, a whole new business model, or a myriad of combinations relative to exponential technology. Although most jurisdictions are not saddled with French employment law, and unions are now far less influential, social media can spin up outrage overnight. Boards and management must be thinking and planning for big workforce changes now, rather than finding themselves sitting in a puddle of desperation. The term “moral harassment” may evolve to cover irresponsible leadership relative to ensuring an adaptive culture! 

Hot Topic 2: Can You Inspire an Audience? 

Source: Forbes

What It’s About: Carmine Gallo is a genius on the topic of story telling. His book, “The Story Teller’s Secret” was a compulsory read for my last executive team. In this article, Gallo refers to “Vital Speeches of the Day,” an organization that distributes awards for the best speech writers and speakers who inspire their audiences. The committee of professional speechwriters who judge the submissions keep the following question top of mind: Could the speech have been delivered by any other speaker, to any other audience, at any other time in history? If the answer is “no,” then it has the makings of a fine speech. 

Why It’s Important: People want authentic personal connection more than ever. And whenever we are talking to people, whether as a speaker or in a meeting, our ability to tell a story and inspire differentiates us by the added value we give. I wish I would have understood this earlier in my career. It is a practiced art. One does not have to be the CEO or even a supervisor to be a storyteller. We all can be inspiring if we give real thought to our message. Don’t waste the opportunity! 

My Weekly Wine Recommendation (Thanks to Vivino):

Triseatum Pinot Noir Willamette Valley 2016

[Picture and ratings provided by Vivino.]

And finally! Here’s Cecil’s Bleat of the Week!

“Managers light a fire under people. Leaders light a fire in people.” – Kathy Austin. 

Bye for now!

– Lorne Rubis

Incase you Missed It:

Monday’s Lead In podcast.

Tuesday’s blog.

Season 3 of Culture Cast

Also don’t forget to subscribe to our site, and follow Lorne Rubis on Instagram, LinkedIn, Facebook and Twitter for the latest from our podcasts, blogs, and all things offered on LorneRubis.com.