Disrupted Assumptions

Accountability

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Key Point: What if most assumptions that we currently make about the world were disrupted? Well, that was the most profound impact to me personally after ruminating over the Singularity Summit I attended in Toronto last week. Yes, the exponential technology introduced at the conference included much of what I’ve written about in previous blogs, and is truly mind blowing. However, the BIG “ah-ha” for me was to more completely understand that every assumption I currently believe will be turned upside down. Let’s explore just a few:

  1. Many of us assume that the best way to learn and develop is to go to kindergarten, grade school, secondary and then of course ideally post secondary. However, what if our education was all wrong? When our phone is smarter than we could ever be, what and how would we need to learn? What if most of our education emphasis was on character and values vital for advancing humankind? After all, the world’s entire content would be accessible through our phones exactly at the time and in the way we needed it. I’m not sure if our grandchildren will ever go to a university as their parents and grandparents did? Nor will they “train” for jobs as we did, because most jobs/careers as we know them will be obsolete. What I can assure you is that they will be “better educated and know much more.”   
  2. Many us assume that people will always be the source for making money and creating wealth. But what if machines made more money than we did? If a driverless car picks us up, and we pay the app a fee for the ride, does the car/machine get a wage? Tip? What will the machine do with that money? Invest it? Pay tax? What will the ethical parameters be?
  3. What if today (not sometime soon) I did NOT assume I would happily die, a life well lived, around 90 years of age? What if I became more intentional about my well being, and that I could live in a positively active way until I was 120? (Longer if I was under 60). Then I would have (in my case), about another 60 or so years to LIVE? Would people still be asking me when I was “going to retire?” What/how might I live the second half of my life?

This blog could go on and on… Every assumption challenged with a “what if?” And how might I/we? Even the slightest variations in our assumptions can have huge impact on the future.

And one new challenged assumption: That innovation and disruption are NOT the same thing. David Roberts of Singularity University duly notes: “Innovation is doing the same things better. Disruption is doing new things that make the old things obsolete.”

Leadership Moves:

  1. Now is the time to be an exponential leader and challenge all of our assumptions, in a purpose driven way, to abundantly advance humankind. The powerful premise for becoming that exponential leader is to not try and change the world. First and foremost, we need to change ourselves. How will you and I do that?

Please click on and enjoy this video below of the Leadership Moves, and stay tuned for an upcoming embedded Lorne Rubis YouTube channel, and Instagram stories/Snapchat videos that will feature many more.

 Video

Disrupted assumptions in the Triangle,

– Lorne

One Millennial View: If we knew exactly how to disrupt and replace a current industry, we’d be the next Steve Jobs. While we may or may not be the next Elon Musk, we can all be involved with teams and organizations that are exponentially changing the world. Assume you can be, seek it, and you’ll have a better chance at involving yourself instead of becoming a spectator.

– Garrett

Edited and published by Garrett Rubis

Terrific Teaming Versus Great Teamwork

Accountability

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Key Point: Powerful and effective TEAMING is an emerging necessity for adaptive results and organization sustainability. TEAMING has evolved from historical notions attributed to teams and teamwork.  Of course, teamwork has and will always be important. However, TEAMING versus great teamwork is both subtly yet profoundly different.

This coming week, I am privileged to have been invited to speak at the Opportunity South Conference & Business Expo 2017 in Lethbridge, Alberta. I love the southern part of our great province for many reasons. Perhaps the biggest is the sense of true community that exists. I am going to share my thoughts about teaming with these passionate community leaders. And I’m going to kick things off with a few core beliefs about the evolving thinking on teaming; one being represented by a quote from Amy Edmondson, the author of “Teaming: How Organizations Learn, Innovate, and Compete in Knowledge Economy.” “TEAMING… IS A DYNAMIC ACTIVITY, NOT A BOUNDED, STATIC ENTITY.” So what is the underlying importance and uniqueness of this statement? Allow me to try and answer with the following perspective.

These are key beliefs about teaming versus teamwork. Terrific Teaming is:

  • A verb.
  • Dynamic & adaptive.
  • Vital for navigating exponential disruption.
  • Spawned and sustained by terrific culture and leadership.

In this blog, I’m going to highlight the characteristics of Terrific Teaming and hopefully provoke or inspire you to think differently and perhaps more comprehensively than you historically have. The characteristics of terrific teaming include the following:

  • Led by leaders who are “gardeners.”
  • Contribution rules; rank and stature indistinguishable in action.
  • Clear on purpose and priorities.
  • Have oneness and high adaptability quotient.
  • Know how to both collaborate and fight well.
  • Thrive off of self accountability, respect, trust, and abundance.
  • Transparent… Everyone needs to see the holistic system.
  • High capability and capacity for compassion and inclusivity.
  • Messy, authentic, awesome organisms more than well oiled machines.
  • Hate sameness… Look to constantly innovate and disrupt.
  • GSD (Get S$!@ Done).
  • Celebrate wins… Have fun.
  • Detest losing; constructive chip on their shoulder.
  • Relentless forward moving and sustainability.
  • Form, expand, contract, disband as hives.
  • Effective networks of networks.

Personal Leadership (Character) Moves:

  1. Assess teams you are part of. How would you evaluate these teams relative to the characteristics of Terrific Teaming?
  2. What actions would you take to address the gaps?
  3. To what extent does your culture and leadership support the spawning and evolution of Terrific Teaming?

Terrific Teaming in The Triangle

Lorne

One Millennial View: I think this is outstanding. You don’t have to be Terrific Teaming or experience leadership for long to understand and appreciate the significance of it. My favorite point above is “hate sameness… Look to constantly innovate or disrupt.” The whole “if it’s not broke, don’t fix it” thing doesn’t seem to apply to good leadership, and if our teams aren’t innovating or disrupting then we have to ask why a pitfall of complacency is comfortable. It likely won’t be for very long. 

– Garrett

Edited and published by Garrett Rubis

Make Me Rich or Die Trying!

Accountability

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Key Point: “9 to 5 is for the weak.” That is the slogan on a popular t-shirt. And my recent three-week vacation gave me a little white space to reflect on how people, including me, use their precious 24 daily hours. It’s duly noted that some people like “Crush It” guru, Gary Vaynerchuk, tells his disciples of hustle; that if they want the “bling,’ they should work 18-hours a day, continuously. And of course Silicon Valley and every other startup/venture driven “valley” anywhere, inspires much of that thinking and behavior; sometimes to a ridiculous degree. Uber competitor, Lyft, posted a blog bragging how one of their drivers went into labor and kept picking up rides on the way to the hospital. After considerable criticism, Lyft pulled down the post. Hustle and good judgment are not necessarily related. 

Chinese start-ups are now becoming notorious for outworking start-ups in other cultures. It’s about working all-in, every day, including weekends for most new Chinese ventures. This start-up reality is even impacting national strategies. The new French president, Emmanuel Macron, has vowed to take on the country’s infamous labor code (the 3324 page, Code du Travail), in order to spark more globally competitive ventures in France. And much of their work force is pushing back.

On the other hand, counter to this obsessive “grind it up” thinking, are successful companies like Basecamp, where workweeks are capped at 40 hours and reduced to 32 in the summer. The founders are publishing a second book celebrating their company culture, entitled the “Calm Company.” And there is much research that questions real productivity gains after 50 to 60 hours of weekly work. So what does this all mean?

My genuine belief is that there is no wrong or right answer to this debate. 9-to-5 is irrelevant to being weak or strong. If “bling,” or some other purpose/outcome turns you on, then be prepared to out grind and outhustle; and recognize that giving up vacations, sleep, relationships is a conscious decision. Choices are made. No complaints or whining with the consequences. Contrary to most pop culture B.S., one usually can’t have it all at the same time. Also, if you want a more integrated work/non-work experience, then that’s cool too (and also possible in both start-up and more traditional environments). Of course, at different stages of life, sometimes fate matches us up for the pace and focus that works for us at that very time. It’s recommended not to judge others through our unique filters.

Character Moves:

  1. Think about how much you are living and working the way you want to right now. Is your pace and focus right for you? Or are you just in a pattern and let the rapids take you along? Consciously choose your 24 precious hours.
  2. One way or another, do not do what you’re doing to essentially/exclusively make someone else rich (or whatever) at your personal expense. I believe that is when we really lose our way; giving up everything we truly value, without getting the mental and financial equity we deserve. 

Just working in The Triangle,

Lorne 

One Millennial View: I too do not believe there’s a right or wrong answer for this, and it’s also a reason why this blog talks a lot more about putting in value than specific amounts of time. We know long hours certainly don’t guarantee you major financial success (just ask a nurse or fireman). I guess all we can do is produce the best work we can, and pay far more attention to our quality of contribution versus eyeing a clock.

– Garrett

Edited and published by Garrett Rubis

Missing the Moment… Time that Has Gone 

Accountability Be Accountable Purpose Time Management

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Key Point: There is a view that there are few things that one cannot recover from: One is a moment that has passed, and of course another is time that has gone. These maxims are worth reflecting on. 

On Wednesday of this week, I was invited to speak to the college football team I played for 46 years ago. It was a players’ only event sponsored by the team captains. No coaches were allowed, and I was invited as a “distinguished” alumni. They had just finished a very long day of team building, and 80 vibrant young men were chowing down on hotdogs and burgers. What could I say to them that might have any value or interest?

I began my talk by challenging each of them on the notion that this was their moment and time; individually and collectively. There would be no other 2017 team. This moment and time was exclusively theirs to define the “brand” of the 2017 team – and it would last forever. This involves much more that the win/loss record. Yes, winning is important, but it is not everything. What would define the kind of team they would be? Just as importantly, what kind of team would they not be? The choice was totally theirs to make. Of course, coaching and the playbook/program are crucial. However, much of the team’s results and brand would be solely defined by the choice and action of the 80 men in front of me. 

On Thursday, I spent my time with 115 of our new hires at the company I work for, introducing them to our purpose and values. While the context is different, the overall challenge is very much the same. What will they do individually and collectively to advance our brand and be part of a winning team? The moment and time is also wholly theirs as they define their contribution and legacy. 

Too often we paddle through life without pausing to intentionally capture the moment and time. Life slips by us faster than we realize. Before we know it, if we are fortunate, we are in front of younger generations in our advancing years, reminding them of the choices and moment/time they have.

Character Moves:

  1. Be conscious of every key moment and time. Be intentional. Neither can be reclaimed. 

Moment and time in The Triangle,

– Lorne

One Millennial View: It’s almost like this should be a subject taught in high school. Millennials often make excuses for how fast our weeks blow by when we’re routinely doing this-and-that. We say, “30 is the new 20,” and “you’re only as old as how you feel.” That could have hints of truth, but, if we’re being honest, maximum time optimization is not always utilized. Maybe there should be an App that only lets you set your alarm for the next morning if you write down a daily experience that some bots deem worthy of reflecting on.

– Garrett

Edited and published by Garrett Rubis

Do Not Use the ‘C-Word’

Accountability Be Accountable Change Personal leadership

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Key Point: Ok, maybe we should end the abusive use of the “C-word,” and that word is “change.” Honestly, I’m worn out with phrases like “change management,” “change resistance,” “change failure,” etc. Let’s all agree that change can be hard. When we have to do things differently, it makes sense that it’s challenging. Most things worth doing involve overcoming hurdles. Ever run a marathon? Few people before running their first one believe it’s going to be a cakewalk. Yet, if you are dedicated and train, I believe anyone can run the 26.2 miles. It’s only a matter of time. I’ve ran two marathons and always wanted to beat my three hour target. I came close. Were my marathons “successful,” even if I didn’t complete one in less than three hours? Heck ya, as far as I’m concerned. This way of thinking may also apply to organization and personal transformation. 

I really liked Nick Tasler’s HBR blog entitled “Stop Using the Excuse ‘Organizational Change is Hard.’” Here is how he concludes, and I whole-heartedly agree: “We have been learning new skills and adapting to new environments literally since the day we squirmed out of the womb. Every time we feel the impulse to say ‘change is hard,’ we could make a different claim that is every bit as accurateAdaptation is the rule of human existence, not the exception.” 

I have been leading big system adaptation and transformation throughout my career. With the risk of sounding over confident, I genuinely believe I can lead (developing a great team around me at the same time), a giant positive transformation in any environment. Depending on the size of the system it will start immediately and three to five years later it will be measurably better. There are common ingredients and my readers may be familiar with the eight-ingredient system for cultural transformation I’ve written about previously. Here are some minimum conditions that are necessary if you want to join me for the rocket ride:

  1. Be prepared to think and be big.
  2. The purpose or “why” has to really matter and be clear.
  3. Love and breathe adaptation like oxygen. 
  4. Have the ability to change perspective. 
  5. Challenge assumptions and be curious as hell. 
  6. Get s#!& done. I detest procrastination.
  7. Love a relentless pace and get energized by it. Be smart enough to know when to rest.
  8. No excuses. You’re fiercely accountable.
  9. Set targets people think are too high.
  10. When people tell you you’re working on too many things at one time, ask them to get the hell out of the way.
  11. Be compassionate, and accept not everyone wants to go for the ride.
  12. Accept critics, skeptics and quickly remove cynics.
  13. Celebrate milestones and understand that your full work and contribution may not be fully appreciated (that’s part of successful adaption).
  14. Do not accept binary success criteria. Transformation is always on a continuum. 
  15. Embrace the uniqueness and personality of the adaptation process; each is deliciously unique.
  16. Enjoy the highs and embrace the lows; grit your teeth, stay calm, relentlessly move forward.
  17. Breathe, pause, and never stop! 
  18. Avoid leaders like me if this list is exhausting.

Character Moves:

  1. Kill the “C-word.”
  2. Adapt, transform, move; make it who you are and recognize it’s a practice, NOT an event!

Adapting as humans in The Triangle,

Lorne 

One Millennial View: I really like this. Sure, “change” is tough, but us Millennials deal with it on such a regular basis that it should be second nature to us in a lot of ways. For example, every social media outlet has changed dramatically since we’ve started using them, and if you pulled up Facebook, Snapchat, Instagram or Twitter’s interface from a few years ago, they would seem outdated. If you’re not adapting as often as an Apple OS update, then you could probably use a reboot.

– Garrett

Edited and published by Garrett Rubis