July Lessons 6: Business is Always Personal

Abundance Accountability Respect

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Over the month of July, I will share lessons learned from my ATB journey, post my retirement announcement effective Aug. 1. The accomplishments and extraordinary results at ATB over six plus years belong to many. However, the learnings I will share are exclusively mine. I hope you will find them thought provoking, and perhaps even instructive.

Story: I worked for one person for many years and gave this individual every effort I had to create value for the organization. I also made a point of knowing something about this person’s children, partner, and even mother. I thought it was important to care about, and know my boss as a complete person. How might I understand his overall ambitions and interests if I didn’t? However, it disappointed me that the reverse was not true. I’m not a “matcher” though, and believed getting to know him more completely was the right thing to do, regardless. What saddened me was that our connection was incomplete without this person knowing something about my family. I wondered how much he actually cared about me. In the end, my concern was valid. I was mostly there as a commercial transaction. It’s just business, right?

Key Point: I’ve worked with wonderful people everywhere. I am so blessed to have spent time with so many people I’ve genuinely loved. Even though it’s challenging, and unrealistic to expect these relationships to fully continue after leaving each organization, the importance carries on. These personal connections actually accumulate to define us. So, one of my beliefs that has been fully endorsed working at ATB, is the idea that business is ALWAYS personal. It is never “just business,” even though that premise has been inappropriately used as rational for questionable behavior far too often.

In this context of business always being personal, I strongly believe you and I have an obligation to genuinely know the people we work closely with, without crossing privacy lines. This includes and is not limited to the following:

  1. Do they have a partner? His or her names?
  2. Do they have children? Grandchildren? Names?
  3. Do they have pets? Names?
  4. What do they do for fun?  
  5. What do they deeply care about?
  6. What do they like to eat?
  7. Coffee or tea? Cream or sugar? Etc. 

If you can’t answer most of these questions about the people who work for you, how can you possibly fully care about them? How can you help them grow and develop more fully? Don’t worry about whether your boss does the same with you. It’s a shame if he/she doesn’t. It’s most important that you set the example. It shows how much you are invested. How can you ask people to deeply care about you and where you want to take the organization without having personal consideration for them?

Personal Leadership Moves:

  1. Connect with your teammates by genuinely getting to know them as complete people, including but not limited to the individuals they dearly love in their personal lives.
  2. Every conversation you have with these people ideally includes a sincere question about those important to them. Everytime!
  3. At minimum, you should know their partner’s name, and how many children they have (or comparable information). If not, why should they believe that you really care about them? No excuses.

Personal connections in Personal Leadership,

Lorne

One Millennial View: Even if you’re shy or believe that exchanging basic personal information with co-workers is a form of prying, there’s just no fun in knowing nothing about those you spend a considerable amount of your life working around. You’re seriously going to sit there all day and never shoot the breeze? We Millennials can definitely multi-task, so 40 plus hours a week are much better spent when your team isn’t a pack of total strangers.

– Garrett

Edited and published by Garrett Rubis

 

July Lessons 5: Duh… What ‘People First’ Really Means

Abundance Accountability Respect

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Over the month of July, I will share lessons learned from my ATB journey, post my retirement announcement effective Aug. 1. The accomplishments and extraordinary results at ATB over six plus years belong to many. However, the learnings I will share are exclusively mine. I hope you will find them thought provoking, and perhaps even instructive.

Story: I recently listened to young professional working at a car dealership tell me he was going to quit because, behind the scenes, the only thing his supervisors cared about was the “upsell.” They wanted customers to rate 10 out of 10, but frankly, their single concern was margin dollars. That’s why buying a car still sucks. Reading about the ugly Wells Fargo “fee pressure and sales upsell” scandal a few years ago made us cringe. Or Volkswagen lying about emissions results, etc. Business, free markets and even non-profits, at their best are marvels of value creation. At their worst, they make people last, both employees and customers.

This is a blinding flash of “duh.” I watched our engagement scores go up every year for six years. Yet, one area that proved to be stubborn and remained relatively flat was the feedback we were getting on “best tools to get the job done.” Regardless of the amount of investment we made in giving people productivity tools, we couldn’t move the needle much. On the principle of personal equity however, we were better every year. So what does this have to with putting people first?

Key Point: Putting people first has always been our strategy. People, customers and the shareholder, in that order. However, my learning after 40 years, believing in people first is NOT exclusive to the business’ human resource department. Of course, deeply caring for the well-being of people is vital, and I prefer to wrap that up under investing in the personal equity of each team member. I believe putting people first before the customer, in it’s best sense, is intentionally looking how every product and service the company provides starts with the questions: “What is the team member experience like to deliver the process, product or service to each other and the customer?” And “how does that team member feel presenting that policy, process, program, etc.?” If we make employees feel great, and in an ideal situation, even make them feel like they have super powers, that really IS people first. Then we become people first AND customer obsessed.

Personal Leadership Moves:

  1. Become almost insanely obsessed looking at the customer experience through the eyes of team members first. Even digital properties need that consideration. Imagine what it will feel like delivering that product, device, policy or the customer service contact after the service/product experience.
  2. Think how to make the process, service, and product the HERO, instead of expecting people to be great because we’ve handed them a “turd sandwich” with parsley on top, to then give the customer. We keep grading people on their ability to compensate on poorly designed, over complex, and crumby offerings. In fact, too often we reward for customer recovery instead of a WOW experience for team members and customers. Become REALLY PEOPLE FIRST.

People First in Personal Leadership,

– Lorne

One Millennial View: As many of you might know, July 16 and 17th is Amazon Prime Day (at least in the U.S.), where all Amazon Prime members are encouraged to take advantage of cyber deals. It’s a huge reminder that human interaction for most goods and services is hardly even necessary anymore. If I want something, I likely can have it shipped to my front door. This suggests that People First is actually more valuable now than in the past, because if the quality of product and customer experience makes things more difficult than clicking a button from the comfort of my own home, then who needs it? People First is a good way to help ensure that you’ll keep seeing people come in at all.

– Garrett

Edited and published by Garrett Rubis

 

July Lessons 4: Find and Free the Unfound

Abundance Accountability Respect

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Over the month of July, I will share lessons learned from my ATB journey, post my retirement announcement effective Aug. 1. The accomplishments and extraordinary results at ATB over six plus years belong to many. However, the learnings I will share are exclusively mine. I hope you will find them thought provoking, and perhaps even instructive.

Story: On July 10, our company celebrated the one year anniversary of switching over to G Suite. It was massive, and by all accounts, a highly successful enterprise undertaking involving 5,000 plus dedicated and growth-minded team members. The entire initiative was one of the most rewarding experiences in my 40 plus year career. One very important part of the entire project involved recruiting and selecting more than 50 “transformers” we called G Evangelists. They had to audition, and came to represent every possible identity and cognitive diverse aspect of our company. The one rule was, if they were selected, their leaders could only say “yes.” And they were assured of a walk back to their roles at the conclusion of their secondment. A few of the people chosen to be G Evangelists were well-known, and high fliers. However, most were buried in the organization, and some were even on the bubble. Others were unsure and even ambivalent about their careers. One year later, almost to a person, they have been promoted and are doing amazing things in the company. Their bond as a cohort is unshakeable, and they still get together once a month on Google Meet, even though the official project has been operationalized since March.

Key Point: Organizations have to get better at finding, freeing, and engaging the unfound. They are everywhere in the company. They often don’t fully understand how talented they are. Even worse, top management is often incapable of reaching deep and taking the smothering blanket of outdated vertical structures out of the way. We need leaders that open opportunities to people who want to raise their hands from any place, any time, any level. There is so much unrealized talent just needing a nudge and leaders who say, “I know you can do it,” “I’m here to support you,” “I’ve got your back.” These men and women are everywhere, and it’s about time we develop new systems and processes to find them, free them and watch them flourish. Imagine if we could do that with more than 5,000 people. It’s a matter of asking “how might we?”

One more thing. I’ve almost never had a lousy performer. People have told me things like, “fire ___, they’re not a leader.” “Working closely, I find ___ to be indispensable when optimizing their strengths. Or, “___ can’t execute.” Yet, somehow working with me, I challenge ___ and, “nothing but net.” I’m no special leader. However, I believe given the right situation, ALL can be great contributors. That’s my job as a leader. Frankly, I’ve found leaders who talk tough about how the company needs way better people are usually the lousiest managers. No one raises their hands to work for them. They mask it well, but prefer fear over development. 

Personal Leadership Moves:

  1. Find the unfound. Please know someone is out there needing an opportunity just like you. Free them up to contribute in ways they might not imagine they could. They will surprise themselves, and you.
  2. Your job includes offering opportunity to others in order to advance them. Abundantly give daily.

Found in Personal Leadership,

One Millennial View: It’s too true. In my experience, we all want a chance to be thrown in the water to see if we’ll swim. With the right coach, most of us will. Nevertheless, we’d rather drown trying than be stuck on a safe, dry dock.

– Garrett

Edited and published by Garrett Rubis

 

July Lessons Part 3: Really Invest in Personal Equity!

Abundance Accountability Respect

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Over the month of July, I will share lessons learned from my ATB journey, post my retirement announcement effective Aug. 1. The accomplishments and extraordinary results at ATB over six plus years belong to many. However, the learnings I will share are exclusively mine. I hope you will find them thought provoking, and perhaps even instructive.

Story: When you’re the Chief People Officer, one of the big responsibilities revolves around compensation. Pay and benefits are often the biggest single expense in any organization. It takes on even greater meaning when one considers this line item as an investment, rather than exclusively as an expense. How does the company get the best possible return for its investment?

Early in 2012/13, we began to introduce the concept of PERSONAL EQUITY into the organization. We knew that the promise of job security was an outdated principle. Heck, we could hardly predict what types of jobs might exist versus offer any employment guarantee. However, we could commit to peoples’ future state becoming better in every way until their very last date of work, whenever that might be. So we chose to make a statement to team members by challenging ourselves to create the best personal equity plan including, but not limited to, the greatest pension savings program ANYWHERE.  

Key Point: Every organization I’ve ever worked at shares one common viewpoint: People would like to be paid more! If you limit compensation to pay and benefits, it can often become an unsatisfactory and relentless chase of market comparison. However, by investing in PERSONAL EQUITY, the lens regarding regarding total compensation becomes much wider. Employees want and need fair pay and benefits. But what if the health benefits feel like they are made just for your situation? What if job experiences, and advancement opportunities are abundant? What if learning, formal and informal is plentiful? What if the leadership treats you like a self-accountable, autonomous adult? What if you are in a highly inclusive, cognitive and identity rich environment? What if there is a commitment to everyones’ financial, physical, emotional, spiritual and experiential well-being? What if the company made the following statement and acted accordingly? “People have the right to have great leaders.” And yes, what if the pension/savings plan was the best in the universe regarding personalization and company matching? With that overall strategy of PERSONAL EQUITY and total compensation, the ability to attract top talent accelerates. The best and brightest people seek that out. During my tenure we have had a few people leave primarily for pay, only to want to find a way back to more personal equity, and ultimately achieve a higher individual return.

Personal Leadership Moves:

  1. Think of investing in people compensation as a comprehensive PERSONAL EQUITY SYSTEM, rather than revolving narrowly along pay/benefits.
  2. At the same time, get highly creative and personal regarding base pay and benefits. Find a scalable and equitable way to customize them for each person. 

Personal Equity and Personal Leadership,

Lorne

One Millennial View: Of course money is an extremely important and necessary currency, but I’ve also come to realize that currency has many forms, not just monetary. Health, communication, culture, goals, time, knowledge, experiences, relationships, and others are also significant types of currency. So, while a great salary is desirable, it isn’t everything. A interesting one-liner I’ve heard is, “rich people have the same nightmares, just on a higher thread count.” I’m willing to bet the better the overall personal equity, the fewer nightmares.

– Garrett

Edited and published by Garrett Rubis

 

The Daily Fight Between Abundance and Scarcity

Abundance

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Story: When I published The Character Triangle, some seven years ago, abundance was a relatively new topic. It has been gratifying to see it recently become more mainstream. An abundance mindset flows out of a deep inner sense of personal worth, self-compassion and security. It is a framework based on the belief that there is more than enough for everyone. Alternatively, a scarcity mindset is the feeling that there will never be enough, resulting in fear, stress, and anxiety. In my life, while far from perfect at this, I always try to generously give to others based on this very freeing and gratifying way of thinking and acting. It is a privilege to act with abundance on a daily basis.

Key Point: Abundance, as with most values and behaviors, can be learned and practiced. Angelina Zimmerman, in an Inc. article, explains this more thoroughly by outlining the seven main differences between those with a scarcity mindset versus an abundance mindset:

“1. Thinking Big versus Thinking Small.
Those with an abundant mindset are renowned for thinking big, it is part of their DNA. Scarcity mindset creates limitations in the mind which prevents the creation of audacious goals.

2. Plenty versus Lack
Those with an abundant mentality believe there is plenty of everything in the world from resources, love, relationships, wealth and opportunities. They believe they can afford what they want in life and say exactly that: ‘I can afford that…’
Those with a lack mentality prefer to believe that there is limited opportunities, resources, relationships, love and wealth. They consistently say: ‘I cannot afford that…’. Saying that statement every day reinforces the belief and forms that exact pattern in the life as reality.

3. Happiness versus Resentment
Someone with an abundant mentality is an optimist and is genuinely happy for others when they achieve success. Conversely, those with a scarcity mindset are competitive and resent others’ success.

4. Embracing Change versus Fear Of Change
A person with an abundant mindset understands that change is an integral part of life. They embrace and accept change. Appreciating the fact that change often leads to more positive outcomes, even if change is somewhat challenging or difficult to navigate. Fear plagues those with a scarcity mindset. They will spend time constantly complaining along about change and take a longer period of time to accept change.

5. Proactive versus Reactive
Due to the positive attitude of those with an abundant mindset, they take a proactive approach to life. Rather than waiting for things to happen and then reacting like those with a scarcity mindset do, they strategically plan for the future and create strategies for the long-term.

6. Learning versus Knowing It All
An abundance mentality craves learning and growth. They have a never ending thirst for knowledge and developing new skills, whereas scarcity mindset believe they know everything thereby severely limiting their learning and growth.

7. What Is Working versus What Is Not Working
A person with a scarcity mindset selects negative thoughts and adopts a victim mentality.”

Personal Leadership Moves:

  1. Just give of yourself without expecting reciprocity. The more you give with generosity of spirit, the more comes back to you in some way, some time. This is even more important when you are feeling like you’re getting the short end of things in life
  2. Forgive those who live in lack and fear. They are plagued with insecurity. Compassionately wish them the best. 
  3. Think big and be big… Always look to expand the pie and share.
  4. Always celebrate others’ successes. Their victories take nothing away from you, even in direct competition. There is always more to gain and learn.

Abundant forever in personal Leadership,

Lorne

One Millennial View: Funny enough, this blog is a little bit of an abundance versus scarcity test within itself. If I noticed that the Inc. article was published in 2016 (more than half a decade after The Character Triangle‘s very similar points), is that scarcity? Instead, I’d like to agree that after years of abundance editing, I too am happy the mindset is becoming more well-known, sought after, and less difficult to define for the mainstream. 

– Garrett

Edited and published by Garrett Rubis